Oct 122011
 

You read it correct ladies and gentlemen. Andy Lees, President of Microsoft’s Mobile unit, in an interview with the Seattle Times, thinks that iOS and Android are making users to go in and out of the apps, but Windows Phones aims at a flowing, almost singular experience.

His views on the iPhone 4S

Q: Do you think the iPhone 4S (running on iOS 5) gives you an opening? Do you think they missed an opportunity there?

A: Yes I do. I think, from an end user’s experience on the software, there’s a lot of interesting reviews written comparing us to iOS 5 and the amount that we’ve got done in 11 months — so some people (are) making comparisons of pace.

Perhaps the biggest comparisons people are making is our people-centricity. The more capabilities we add into our phone, the more delightful it becomes to use because you seem to have more at your fingertips without this clutter and confusion of the other platforms.

From a pure hardware perspective, I was surprised they’re not giving the consumer more choice. People want a variety of different things.

Pertaining to Android, he thinks that

…Android is heading down this chaotic phase. We want to enable OEMs (original equipment manufacturers), we want to enable operators, but we don’t want chaos.

If you’ve used some of the (Android) phones, some of them are great, but some of them are not great. But it’s random. And it feels like, with some of them, that you’ve had several cooks in the kitchen trying to bake different things with the same thing. Whereas we have much more coherency in the totality of what somebody gets when they buy our phone.

Quite interestingly, on the $100 phone option, his views are as follows

Q: Do you expect consumers to be able to walk in this holiday season and see some nice options for Windows Phone for around $100?

A: Or below. The strategy I’m talking about here is choice, different price points, different geographies.

The other thing that people ask about is what’s happening in terms of the level of commitment that (manufacturers) have to promoting or marketing phones. (In terms of Nokia, which will be using Windows Phone exclusively on all its smartphones), they’re 100 percent betting on Windows Phone. They have more reach than anybody else in terms of selling phones. They directly and indirectly manage over 600,000 retail outlets.

Having them so committed to Windows Phone is going to be a fundamental element for us to not only have great hardware but also huge reach and breakthrough with the customer.

We think it’s (also) going to be an accelerant for other OEMs (including Samsung, which reached an agreement with Microsoft recently to cooperate in the development and marketing of Windows Phone, and HTC, which is increasing its sales and marketing commitment).

From whatever Mr Lees said, Windows Phone is definitely going to be the third ecosystem.


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